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CCM v WU.. Spool Bowl.. Our hope for redemption!

BrisRecky

I'm an idiot savant without the pesky savant bit
I hope this doesn’t come across rude or racial, but I think Kaltak is still on island time , he needs to get splinters for a bit , bring back Dan da Man if possible or maybe Windust ..and a exTra mid wouldn’t go astray either, cause NizMonsta , to me, looked like he was still favouring his ankle late on …but what do I know
 

Ancient Mariner

Well-Known Member
Looking at this reminded me we're playing moneyball
I have read the book "Moneyball".
It is not just about buying cheaper players, it is about buying better players for a cheap price because their attributes have been overlooked due to rival teams using flawed metrics to judge them.
The story is more about the flawed metrics that baseball uses to judge the quality of players and one manager's courage to use a totally different set of metrics in the face of derision and ridicule from both within his own club and from the wider world of the game.
He was forced to use this new approach because of restrained finances of the club he was managing.
The restrained finances of the clubs are the only similarities between the Oakland Athletics and CCM.
We are not playing Moneyball, we are playing production line, develop and sell ball.
If we were playing Moneyball we would be continually near the top of the table.

The book is well worth reading as it goes much further into the reasons why it was effective in baseball, a game in which stats rule to a ridiculous degree.
 

marinermick

Well-Known Member
I have read the book "Moneyball".
It is not just about buying cheaper players, it is about buying better players for a cheap price because their attributes have been overlooked due to rival teams using flawed metrics to judge them.
The story is more about the flawed metrics that baseball uses to judge the quality of players and one manager's courage to use a totally different set of metrics in the face of derision and ridicule from both within his own club and from the wider world of the game.
He was forced to use this new approach because of restrained finances of the club he was managing.
The restrained finances of the clubs are the only similarities between the Oakland Athletics and CCM.
We are not playing Moneyball, we are playing production line, develop and sell ball.
If we were playing Moneyball we would be continually near the top of the table.

The book is well worth reading as it goes much further into the reasons why it was effective in baseball, a game in which stats rule to a ridiculous degree.

Movie is good too. Brad Pitt was excellent.

Agree with everything you said. If we were playing money ball we would have a maths expert as part of the back room staff.
 

Corsair

Well-Known Member
I have read the book "Moneyball".
It is not just about buying cheaper players, it is about buying better players for a cheap price because their attributes have been overlooked due to rival teams using flawed metrics to judge them.
The story is more about the flawed metrics that baseball uses to judge the quality of players and one manager's courage to use a totally different set of metrics in the face of derision and ridicule from both within his own club and from the wider world of the game.
He was forced to use this new approach because of restrained finances of the club he was managing.
The restrained finances of the clubs are the only similarities between the Oakland Athletics and CCM.
We are not playing Moneyball, we are playing production line, develop and sell ball.
If we were playing Moneyball we would be continually near the top of the table.

The book is well worth reading as it goes much further into the reasons why it was effective in baseball, a game in which stats rule to a ridiculous degree.
Thanks for the lecture lol. I know the story, my opinion is we do have Moneyball players (ok maybe not the Maths but the general concept), hopefully I'll be proven right by the end of the season. Last season Beni was a perfect example, lolloping strange gait and he got called Uncololo, turned out to be a great signing. I'm hoping some of our other players that on the surface of it look like dodgy signings are going to come good or at least gel into a formidable team together. I would also suggest that Cummings was a Moneyball play, everyone else had written him off, everyone said he'd be trouble and we were crazy....you could throw Niz in here as well, smaller than your average bear and no doubt gets overlooked because of it but we see the value in him.
 
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Ancient Mariner

Well-Known Member
Movie is good too. Brad Pitt was excellent.

Agree with everything you said. If we were playing money ball we would have a maths expert as part of the back room staff.
The movie was excellent and extremely entertaining and very close to the true story, but really did not go as deeply into the process as is explained in the book.

Baseball is a game where a player's value is based on his stats. The book explains how most of the stats traditionally used in judging a player were flawed or meaningless and that new metrics were more effective.

It would be nice if it could be applied to football. Unfortunately or it is not a game where stats rule and decisions can be made without even watching a player. Baseball, while being a team game is really a game where a team is made up of individuals acting their parts alone. Football is a team game where interactions between individuals are crucial to a successful outcome.

As you correctly point out we do not have a maths wiz in the backroom staff. I do not see that one would be of use, as football does not lend itself to the "Moneyball" method.

The point I am trying to is that what "Moneyball" is about is spelt out in the rest of the title of the book, "The Art of Winning an Unfair Game". It is about succeeding with a small budget.
Our club is about developing a system of making money to be self supporting and in the long term to make enough money to be able to compete with the bigger Clubs.

Maybe I am being pedantic but "Moneyball" is not about making money. The similarity between us and the Oakland A's approach is that both will sign a player as seen a bargain. Oakland A's with a view to wins (not making money), our approach (with the exception of a couple of senior leaders) is to sign players and develop youth with a view to making money.
 

Corsair

Well-Known Member
Anyone been to see if Hall is training full up? I still think something smells funny
He was in the Western stand chatting to fans about 15 mins before kick off on Saturday, looked ok but then I don't know what he usually looks like :) It would be interesting to know if he's training with the team.
 

Ancient Mariner

Well-Known Member
Matthew Benham applied it successfully to Midtjyland and Brentford. Link below. Interestingly enough Brentford have eliminated their academy as a result.

Thanks Mick. It would be interesting to know all the sabermetrics he used. I would imagine that many would have been pretty subjective due to the nature of our game.
It would be fascinating to read an in-depth study of his system.
 

marinermick

Well-Known Member
Thanks Mick. It would be interesting to know all the sabermetrics he used. I would imagine that many would have been pretty subjective due to the nature of our game.
It would be fascinating to read an in-depth study of his system.

Click the link and they do mention some sabermetrics used
 

Ancient Mariner

Well-Known Member
They only mentioned expect goals as well as goals and assists.
I can only guess they are use similar measurements as those to be found in some fantasy leagues.
 

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